Sunday
March 26, 2017

Law & Ethics: In Court Articles

  • Tue, 11/01/2005

    A New Jersey appellate court has ruled that a real estate salesperson is not liable for a contractor’s failure to find problems with a property's septic system, even though the contractor was chosen by the salesperson.

  • Tue, 11/01/2005

    A Georgia appellate court has determined that a buyer’s broker and her company weren’t liable for failing to disclose a gas leak in a house when they were unaware of the problem.

  • Sat, 10/01/2005

    New Hampshire's highest court has ruled that a college student could collect damages from a landlord who allegedly misrepresented the number of bedrooms the student would be leasing from him.

  • Sat, 10/01/2005

    The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that an eminent domain case raising issues already litigated and decided in state court can’t be subsequently tried through the federal court system.

  • Thu, 09/01/2005

    A Louisiana appeals court has ruled that a real estate brokerage may be liable for a “For Sale” sign placed on the wrong property by one of its salespeople if that salesperson is an employee of the company and not an independent contractor.

  • Thu, 09/01/2005

    A Texas appeals court has ruled that a buyer suffered no economic loss and is therefore not entitled to damages from an MLS listing that misrepresented a home’s square footage.

  • Mon, 08/01/2005

    In a blow to private property rights, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that a municipality can use its power of eminent domain to take unblighted property that will be used for private development, so long as that local government determines that the development benefits the entire community.

  • Mon, 08/01/2005

    A California appellate court has ruled that a buyer who had to pay a document preparation fee to a brokerage may proceed with a class-action suit against the company and its parent.

  • Fri, 07/01/2005

    A Georgia appellate court has ruled that although a seller’s dog attacked potential buyers during a showing, the real estate professionals involved had no reason to know that the dog posed a threat to potential buyers.

  • Fri, 07/01/2005

    A Connecticut court has ruled that a noncompete clause in a brokerage’s contract wasn’t enforceable because the salesperson’s move to another company didn’t unfairly harm the brokerage.