Friday
November 24, 2017

News & Commentary: Daily News Articles

  • 11/07/2017
    The country’s opioid crisis is putting real estate agents increasingly on the front lines in having to deal with addicts posing as potential homebuyers, CNBC reports. 
  • 11/07/2017
    Home prices in a few areas have skyrocketed by up to 95 percent over the past five years. 
  • 11/07/2017
    Part of what it means to be a REALTOR® is having deep humility, gratitude, and care for your fellow neighbors. Learn how to live the spirit of real estate from these motivational moments during last week’s REALTORS® Conference & Expo in Chicago.
  • 11/06/2017
    Do you know what skills you’ll need to keep your business viable in a changing real estate market? These tips from the REALTORS® Conference & Expo in Chicago will help you refine the service you provide your clients.
  • 11/06/2017
    “We’re only as great as the people we lead say we are,” said real estate coach Alicia Matheson during a Sunday session at the REALTORS® Conference & Expo in Chicago. Get tips and tools from broker conversations that you can start implementing today.
  • 11/06/2017
    “Real estate agents fear being replaced, and they will be. They’ll be replaced by a real estate agent with technology,” said broker Carrie Little during the conference this week. Here’s what aspiring real estate techies need to get up to speed on.
  • 11/06/2017
    The conference is both a time to celebrate the history of the National Association of REALTORS® and to get a glimpse of the future of the organization. Here’s a look at what happened and what’s still to come.
  • 11/06/2017
    The association declares its opposition, saying the bill would raise taxes on middle-class homeowners, cause home values to plunge, and financially burden future generations.
  • 11/06/2017
    Among other considerations, agents will get more flexibility in their MLS choice.
  • 11/03/2017
    In a new partnership with a consumer research firm, NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun explores how new approaches to real estate development might turn "not in my backyard" residents into proponents of additional affordable housing in their neighborhoods.